Progress on the Boat.

The trip to Wyocena didn’t pan out yesterday. Neither of us really felt like driving 40 miles, to go someplace we haven’t ever scouted. I hope we do get a chance to look it over. It would be nice to have one more place to try to hunt for fall turkey and deer, and it’s a big piece of land. We could possibly take the camper with us so we wouldn’t have to wake up at 3am to drive 45 minutes up there.

Instead, Matt decided to nap (which I later wished I had done myself) while I had coffee, picked up around the house, and wrote that post. Then we started to work on the boat some more. The next step of the process is to gut the thing, but first we had to clear everything off the transom. That included the stern engine mount and the rest of the lower engine unit. With how oddly placed some of the bolts were, Matt had to pick up 3 new ratchet drivers, trying to find something that would fit to get out one last bolt. Eventually, we got them all off.

The engine compartment, and the transom to the left. Before removing the mount.

The engine compartment, and the transom to the left. Before removing the mount.

After the interior bracket was removed, but before we got the lower unit fully removed.

After the interior bracket was removed, but before we got the lower unit fully removed.

Done!

Done!

You can see the corrosion and build up on the wood. The engine mount was corroded enough itself that it was in two pieces, and some of the bolts had been eaten away at, too. Matt wants to remove the transom last, so that we can trace the outlines of the deck contours onto it, and then also trace those contours onto the new transom piece. We picked up some thin foam to trace the curved parts we need to cut out. But before we could get to that point, we needed to drain the fuel tank. We decided to do that after we got back from our evening hunt (which was so uneventful I won’t post about it. A group of three hunters tromped right past our set up around 6, and after we got disgusted at their discourtesy and left, a hen walked out as another hunter showed up and noisily made his way into the woods).

The large, rusty black rectangle? Fuel tank. Info online said it could hold 50 gallons.

The large, rusty black rectangle? Fuel tank. Info online said it could hold 50 gallons.

Since it had been exposed to the elements, it was rusted. Surprisingly, it only had one spot where it was rusted through, and it was pretty small. We had originally figured the gas tank was just under that sheet of steel, but yesterday in the sun, I saw there was fluid in there. And kind of a lot. While disconnecting everything from the transom, Matt undid the fuel hose and drained it. Then came the fun part. We had to siphon out all the fluid in the tank.

I doubt it was all gas. With that hole in it, a lot was probably water, and the gas is probably long since spoiled. Matt had some old tubing from a fish tank, and we got a bucket and started the siphon. He got some of that mix of gross in his mouth, unfortunately. I think he brushed his teeth 7 or 8 times yesterday.

Soon, one five gallon bucket was full. Then another. Matt checked online, and we got the 50 gallon number. We hoped it wasn’t full. We only have a few 5 gallon buckets. The flow was slow. Matt had hoped to drain the tank and pull it out last night. The siphon didn’t stop until about 10:30 last night. 

Just under 20 gallons of yuck.

Just under 20 gallons of yuck.

Now we can at least get the fuel tank out and hopefully start pulling out rotten wood and old fiberglass.

As far as turkey season goes, my tags are up tomorrow. After being up from 4am-almost-11pm yesterday, there wasn’t any way I could have woken up to go hunting this morning. And anyway, I wanted Matt to be with me for the last few hunts. He has too much to do today to take even a little bit of the morning off. I work a little earlier tomorrow than I do today, but if I get up at 4 again, that gives me another four and a half hours before I have to get home and get ready for work. My idea is to give it one last go by setting up on the public sliver of the hayfield we heard them fly to yesterday morning. We’ve got big plans for next weekend though, so stay tuned.

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